Fictive Kin 1, 2016
Wood, plexiglass, mirror, steel, aluminium leaf, cotton, found objects
27.5cm x 27.5cm x 5cm

Fictive Kin 2, 2016
Wood, plexiglass, photograph, steel needles, insects, found objects
27.5cm x 27.5cm x 5cm

Fictive Kin 3, 2017
Wood, plexiglass, paper, cotton, safety pins, found objects
27.5cm x 27.5cm x 5cm

Fictive Kin 5, 2017
Wood, plexiglass, paper, bullets, found objects
27.5cm x 27.5cm x 5cm

Boxed installation view of Fictive Kin

 

With changes in industrialization and increased economic independence, the emergence of the nuclear family model marks the era of consumerism and a new form of social organization.

As means of mass production shifted and the independent economic ability increased, the emergence of the nuclear family model marks the era of consumerism and a new form of social organization. It was a time of optimism and progress, of science and technology. The resources seemed endless and nature would soon be domesticated.

The Fictive Kin series revisits the idealism which the population have once projected into the/their future as a middle class young couple founding a family, vowing not to repeat the same mistakes as the previous generation. However, the bourgeoning air of advancement and hope stops at the front door; a quick peek confirms a culture manufactured through unsustainable exploitation of resources exchanged for capital gain, a social model that fails to address the psychological and emotional well being of the people.

In 2016, with the zeitgeist utopia long gone, the present seems uncertain. Yet the future has to be different despite our self-mutilation.